Episode 5: Dr. Amy Smith-Morris (Ovarian Cancer at 30)

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“Being 30 and diagnosed with cancer, I would go to support groups and be the youngest by 20, 30 years. It makes it really difficult to identify with this other group of cancer fighters because they don’t have the same problems” – Dr. Amy Smith-Morris

Dr. Amy Smith-Morris is a cancer pharmacist turned cancer survivor. She was diagnosed with ovarian cancer at age of 30, right after she returned from her honeymoon in Italy. When she started undergoing chemotherapy, she live streamed her treatments answering viewer questions — since then, she has continued to share her experiences through various media and social media channels. On this episode, we talk about how her experience as a cancer pharmacist affected her as a patient, how cancer changed her as a person (and that it’s okay to just say no sometimes), and finally, the importance of advocating for yourself.

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What we mention on this episode/great resources:

Amy’s Interview with Huffington Post

Cancer Foundation of Saskatchewan: Amy’s Story

Surviv(her)

Cancer-Related Fatigue

Follow Amy: 

Website/Blog

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Follow Dr. Teplinsky:

Instagram

Twitter

About Dr. Teplinsky

Support Interlude: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky. If you’re enjoying the show, please leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. If you liked this episode, please share with your friends and family.

If you are interested in being a guest on the show, please e-mail me at interludecancerstories@gmail.com. 

Episode 4: Pari Berk (Colon Cancer at 43)

Listen and Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Stitcher

Pari Berk is an personal essayist, lawyer and mother of two children. She is currently finishing her memoir, The Meatpacker’s Daughter while undergoing chemotherapy for recurrent colon cancer. In this episode, we discuss how she first knew something was wrong while working out at Orangetheory Fitness, her initial colon cancer treatment and subsequent recurrence, and how in the midst of her treatment, she decided to do something for herself by using her maiden name again. March 1st also begins National Colon Cancer Awareness Month. This year’s campaign from the Colorectal Cancer Alliance is “Don’t Assume.” Don’t assume you’re too young for colorectal cancer. Don’t assume you’re alone. Don’t assume we can’t beat colorectal cancer.

PariBerkPhoto(Photo credit: http://www.pariberk.com)

What we mention on this episode:

Myself, By Any Other Name (New York Times article)

Moving into my mother’s basement helped my kids — and helped save my life (Washington Post article)

Blue Hope Nation | Colorectal Cancer Alliance

Colontown

Financial Toxicity and Cancer Treatment

American Cancer Society Updates Colorectal Cancer Screening Guideline

Follow Pari:

Website

Instagram

Twitter

Facebook

Follow Dr. Teplinsky:

Instagram

Twitter

All About Dr. Teplinsky

 

Support Interlude: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky. If you’re enjoying the show, please leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. If you liked this episode, please share with your friends!

 

Episode 3: Ingrid Kolstoe (Low Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer at 41)

“You get that diagnosis and it is just the beginning. There is a lot of science out there that is really going to be on your side. But you’ve got to have the information.” – Ingrid Kolstoe

Ingrid Kolstoe is a 41 year old mother of three girls who was just recently diagnosed with a rare form of ovarian cancer (low grade serous ovarian carcinoma). She recently had surgery and is going to be starting chemotherapy. We talk about how she feels about being diagnosed with a rare cancer at such a young age, her experience with the National Cancer Institute Rare Tumor Initiative, the importance of genetic testing and the effect this diagnosis has had on her family. 

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What we mention on this episode/great resources:

General information on ovarian cancer

Types and stages of ovarian cancer

Rare ovarian tumors (including low grade serous ovarian carcinoma)

Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer

NCI Rare Diseases ResearchGenomic profiling through Foundation Medicine

Follow Dr. Teplinsky:

Instagram

Twitter

Blog

All About Dr. Teplinsky

Support Interlude: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky. If you’re enjoying the show, please leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. If you liked this episode, please share with your friends!

Listen and Subscribe on Apple Podcasts |Google Play |Stitcher

 

Episode 2: Katie Kashmanian (Inflammatory Breast Cancer at 50)

“The biggest surprise of all was how hard it was after I was done with treatment and to try to struggle back to a sense of normal.” – Katie Kashmanian

Katie is a middle school principal and was diagnosed with inflammatory breast cancer in 2014 right before she was supposed to travel to China to adopt her son. Despite the fact that she had to go through aggressive chemotherapy, her oncologists told her “go get him!” — and she did.

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In this episode, Katie talks about how she coped with her diagnosis and treatment, how she dealt with the aftermath and how she is spreading the word about inflammatory breast cancer. I hope you enjoy our conversation!

What we mention on this episode:

All about inflammatory breast cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Importance of clinical trials in cancer treatment

Support Interlude: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky. If you’re enjoying the show, please leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts (iTunes). If you liked this episode, please share with your friends!

Listen & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | Stitcher  | Google Play

 

 

Episode 1: Izabela Gardula (Breast Cancer at 33)

“I’m going to wake up and it’s not going to be breast cancer. It’s just going to be a cyst.” – Izabela Gardula

IMG_4945Izabela was diagnosed with HER2 positive breast cancer when she was 33 years old in 2016. Since her diagnosis, she has become an incredible breast cancer advocate for women who are newly diagnosed and those going through treatment. On this episode,  Izabela is open and honest about her experience. She shares what it’s like to find out you have breast cancer, when results don’t always go your way, and what it’s like to come face to face with a grizzly bear (literally!) after going through cancer treatment.

What we mention on this episode:

The tradition Izabela started to celebrate the end of chemotherapy

Use of nurse navigators to help with diagnosis and treatment

Use of a port during chemotherapy

Follow Izabela: 

Instagram @izabela_gdd

Follow Dr. Teplinsky:

Instagram @drteplinsky

Twitter @drteplinsky

Blog

Support Interlude: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky. If you’re enjoying the show, please leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. If you liked this episode, please share with your friends!

 

 

 

Welcome to the INTERLUDE Podcast!

A diagnosis of cancer is life changing. Days after a diagnosis will be filled with multiple appointments, lots of different doctor visits, tests and procedures (and then, even more tests and procedures), and discussions about treatment plans (surgery, chemotherapy, radiation). As an oncologist, I spend a lot of time with my patients in planning and making sure all of the above happens. Yet, we very rarely have the opportunity to truly discuss how a cancer diagnosis affects a woman emotionally. We don’t often have the time to delve into a woman’s feelings, worries, and fears. Furthermore, women may not feel comfortable having these conversations with their physician. Discussions about intimate topics such as sexual health and relationships can be difficult. There’s so much that goes unsaid in a 15 minute follow-up visit but these conversations need to take place. Emotional health is just as important as physical health.

The goal of the “INTERLUDE: Women’s Cancer Stories with Dr. Teplinsky” Podcast is to have these difficult conversations.  In this podcast, I will be speaking with women who are all at various stages of their cancer journey (including those who are newly diagnosed, currently in treatment, survivors, and women with stage 4 disease). We will talk about anything and everything related to the cancer experience. Many women feel overwhelmed or uncomfortable at in-person support groups or may not have anyone to discuss their experiences with. My hope is that this podcast will provide support, encouragement, inspiration, hope, courage, inspiration, and most importantly, strength to women as they navigate through their own cancer journey.

Cancer brings normal life to a halt. It creates an interlude. Let’s talk about it.

If you are interested in being a guest on the show, please e-mail me at interludecancerstories@gmail.com.